Thursday, 13 October 2016

Phonica: Four

The fourth edition of Phonica takes place on Wednesday 19 October, and we're excited to be joined by Martín Bakero, Susan Connolly, John KearnsNeil Ó Lochlainn, Elizabeth Hilliard and David Lacey for a set of performances and presentations traversing the realms of sound poetry, electronic music, visual poetry, improvisation, and more.

about Phonica

Phonica: Four
Wednesday 19 October 2016
Jack Nealons, 165 Capel Street, Dublin 1
8pm start
admission free

Martín Bakero has presented performances, lectures, films, expositions, installations and radio programs in many locations throughout Europe and North, Central and South America. He has experimented with combinatorial, permutation, genetic, astrobiology, quantum mechanics, sound, vision and psychics arts. He studied electroacoustic composition at the conservatory of Paris and has taught in the Universities of Paris, México and Chile specialising in severe personality disorders and sound poetry. He created the pneumatic and electropneumatic poetry, he’s working now in “Acousemantic” poetry. Recently he made creative sound residences and performances in Avatar (Québec), National center for arts (México) and Proposta (Barcelona). He’s member of LaBoRaToiRe , Motor Nightingale, Buzos Tácticos, M’Other, Futures Primitives, Mutiques and pnEUmAtIkOs, where he works with other artistes, scientists, mystics in different rehearsals about the bounds between poetry, music, vision and reality. He created the festival Festina Lente and the Laboratory of electropneumatic poetry (Laboratoire d’electropoésie acousmantique) in Paris. All these fields that he explores allow him to give birth to transversal and unprecedented performances. In his shows, he drives a trance where the breath becomes alive. He uses especially poems moving, projected on his body, on his collaborators and screens. He also specializes his voice in multiphony, modified in live by acousmantic filters. He explores the boundaries between sound, sense, senses, nonsense, smell, vision, action, hallucination, gesture in poetry, always seeking the opening of the limits of poetry and news realities.

Susan Connolly lives in Drogheda, Co. Louth. Her first full-length collection For the Stranger was published by Dedalus Press in 1993. She was awarded the Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry in 2001. In the same year she received a Publications Grant from the Heritage Council of Ireland for A Salmon in the Pool, a literary and place-names map of the river Boyne from source to sea. Collaborations with writer and photographer Anne-Marie Moroney include Stone and Tree Sheltering Water (1998), Race to the Sea (1999), Ogham: Ancestors Remembered in Stone (2000) and Winterlight (2002). Her poems have been published in journals and magazines throughout Ireland and the U.K, are included in the Field Day Anthology Vol IV, Voices and Poetry of Ireland and Windharp: Poems of Ireland since 1916, and have been broadcast on The RTÉ Poetry Programme. Her second collection Forest Music was published by Shearsman Books in 2009. Shearsman also published her chapbook The Sun-Artist: a book of pattern poems in 2013, and her third book Bridge of the Ford, a collection of visual poetry, in June 2016.

John Kearns has published poetry in a variety of publications and his long poem 'begs dull' was selected for inclusion in the recent Irish edition of Viersomes (Veer Press, London). He is currently working on a volume loosely addressing hoarding. He has worked extensively as a translator from Polish and edited the journal Translation Ireland for 10 years. He also edited the collection Translator and Interpreter Training: Issues, Methods, Debates (London, Continuum: 2008). He holds a PhD from DCU and worked for several years in academia. He is particularly interested in issues relating to mental health and is currently training as a psychotherapist.

Neil Ó Lochlainn is a double bassist, traditional flute player and composer from Ireland. He has studied at the Cork School of Music, the Banff Centre, the S.I.M (school for improvisational music) workshop, New York and the Brhaddhvani Institute, Chennai. He is a founding member of Ensemble Ériu (TG4 Gradam Ceoil recipients 2015) and in 2015 he formed Cuar, a group which combines improvisation, chamber music and irish traditional music. From 2012-2015 he perfomed regularly with the late jazz guitar master Louis Stewart.

Elizabeth Hilliard is a soprano from Dublin. She sings a wide range of repertoire, bringing a dramatic quality and emotional intensity to her performances. She combines pinpoint accuracy and razorsharp musicianship with her passion and relish for performing music by living composers. Elizabeth is a co-director (with David Bremner) of Béal, a production company committed to exploring the relationship between sung and spoken word.  The pair have brought international figures such as Robert Ashley, Tom Johnson, Jennifer Walshe and Christopher Fox to Dublin. In October 2016, Divine Arts Record are releasing ‘Sea to the West’ Elizabeth’s debut disc, featuring works for soprano plus electronics by Mulvey, Bremner, Fox and Buckley. She also features on Mulvey’s CD Akanos released on the Navona Records Label.  From December 2015 to March 2016 she was musician in residence at dlrLexIcon supported by Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council. Current projects include: Don’t Walk - a 45-minute piece from video-artist Mihai Cucu and composer Gráinne Mulvey, for guitar, cello, soprano, electronics and video; Béal 2016: Inappropriate Moments - directing ensembÉal in performances of vocal ensemble music by Jennifer Walshe; Logical Fallacies - a 45 minute work for viola and soprano by David Bremner, performed with Andreea Banciu.

David Lacey is a musician from Dublin, working at the intersection between improvisation and composition. He uses percussion, objects, cassettes and crude electronics, as well as making studio constructions. He has been featured on releases from labels such as Another Timbre, Confront, Copy for your Records, Fort Evil Fruit & Room Temperature. Alongside composers Rob Casey and Conal Ryan, he co-curates the concert series ‘Reception’.

Friday, 23 September 2016

Art & Writing | #1: IMPRINT

Art & Writing, organised by Paper Visual Art and gorse journals, is a series of conversations between practitioners who work at the intersection of writing and the visual arts.

This autumn, three events will take place in Dublin, bringing together artists and writers to present and discuss their work, and exploring the overlaps.

I'll be taking part in the first event - details below. My thanks to Paper Visual Art for the invitation.


Thursday 29 September 2016
Studio 6, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios
Dublin 2
6.30 p.m.

Participants: Christodoulos Makris, Dennis McNulty, and Nick Thurston
Moderator: Jessica Foley

All welcome. No booking required.

Monday, 22 August 2016

gorse No. 6

Issue 6 of gorse is now out.

It features original essays from Dylan Brennan, Liam Cagney, Dominique Cleary, Lauren Elkin, Oliver Farry, Daniel Fraser, Thomas McNally and Joanna Walsh; new fiction from Gavin Corbett, Lauren de Sa Naylor, John Holten, Bridget Penney and David Rose; an interview with Geoff Dyer by Rob Doyle; and an Irish language section (edited by new Irish language editor Aifric Mac Aodha) with work from Simon Ó Faoláin & Colm Ó Ceallacháin.

Poetry in gorse No. 6 comes from long-time contributor SJ Fowler in the form of 'Estates', four cross-referencing, border-hopping poems; recent work from Aodán McCardle representing reflections on a year's worth of language use and images encountered on various media; four new pieces by Julie Morrissy taken from a book-length work-in-progress; and three original poems in the Galician by Chus Pato, accompanied by translations from Keith Payne.

Susan Tomaselli's editorial 'Je est un autre' revolves around Borges and notions of identity. It includes an extract - a translation of a sentence from a short story by Borges - from artist Katie Holten's book About Trees, which is itself written in trees - a new typeface Holten made especially for the project.

The cover image is once again by award-winning designer Niall McCormack.

gorse No. 6 is available to order directly from our web shop.


Please join us for the issue launch on Thursday 25 August in The Liquor Rooms (5 Wellington Quay, Dublin 2) with readings by Dominique Cleary, Gavin Corbett and Julie Morrissy. Start time is 7pm and admission is free.

Wednesday, 13 July 2016

Poetry Ireland Review 118: The Rising Generation

I was pleased to be invited by current editor Vona Groarke to contribute to a special issue of Poetry Ireland Review titled 'The Rising Generation'.

Much like The Poetry Book Society UK’s  Next Generation Poets, which is published once a decade, Poetry Ireland Review 118: The Rising Generation (April 2016) aims to offer "the most comprehensive, insightful and enjoyable overview of what we can expect of Irish poetry in the coming times." To this end, Groarke selected thirty-six poets who published a first book or pamphlet in the past five years, with each poet represented by two pages of new poetry and their responses to a wide-ranging and generally light-spirited questionnaire.

My poetry contribution consists of two excerpts ('trying to cook breakfast...' and 'In '87 Huey Lewis...') from a book-length work-in-progress composed using appropriative processes.

Groarke writes in her editorial: "I also acknowledge, as anthologists must, that in time this selection may look fusty or airy; that I may have gotten it all wrong, (there, I’ve said it), and that in twenty-five years, the poets who will have made a difference are not those featured here. It’s possible, but I doubt it. I believe there’s good and exciting work here, work that will continue to be honoured and enjoyed in all its many shades."

The list of 'The Rising Generation' poets includes several friends and people I've worked with in one form or another, as well as one or two names new to me:

Graham Allen, Tara Bergin, Dylan Brennan, Sarah Clancy, Jane Clarke, Adam Crothers, Paula Cunningham, Ailbhe Darcy, Martin Dyar, Elaine Gaston, Eleanor Hooker, Caoilinn Hughes, Andrew Jamison, Victoria Kennefick, Marcus Mac Conghail, Robert Herbert McClean, Afric McGlinchey, Jim Maguire, Christodoulos Makris, Geraldine Mitchell, Julie Morrissy, Emma Must, Doireann Ní Ghríofa, Mary Noonan, Rebecca O'Connor, Ciarán O'Rourke, Michelle O'Sullivan, Breda Wall Ryan, Stephen Sexton, Michael Naghten Shanks, Róisín Tierney, Jessica Traynor, Eoghan Walls, Adam White, Adam Wyeth.

Poetry Ireland Review 118: The Rising Generation is available to order directly from Poetry Ireland.

Monday, 27 June 2016

gorse interview on 3:AM Magazine

Susan Tomaselli & I were recently interviewed by 3:AM Magazine's Tristan Foster for a feature on gorse.

In response to his perceptive questions we discuss the journal's history, scope, outlook and goals, and offer thoughts on editing a print journal with an interest in experimental writing as well as related topics such as the potential of literature, the avant-garde, and "transgressing boundaries".

We also announce plans for an associated imprint set to begin operations in 2017. A publishing statement will follow, but we were very happy to reveal that the first two titles will be an anthology of essays edited by Joanna Walsh, and Subcritical Tests, a book of collaborative poetry by Ailbhe Darcy & SJ Fowler.

An excerpt from Subcritical Tests appeared in gorse No. 3. Below is Ailbhe Darcy & SJ Fowler at the Cork leg of Yes But Are We Enemies:

The feature was published on Bloomsday 2016. Many thanks to Tristan Foster and to 3:AM Magazine.

Monday, 6 June 2016

Phonica: Three

For the third edition of Phonica we will be joined by Michelle Hall, Keith Lindsay, Aodán McCardle, Michael Naghten Shanks, Dylan Tighe and Suzanne Walsh for a blend of sound, word, image and performance rooted in multidisciplinary practice and innovation.

Phonica is a Dublin-based poetry and music venture with an emphasis on multiformity and the experimental. Curated and hosted by Christodoulos Makris and Olesya Zdorovetska, Phonica aims to provide an outlet for the exploration and presentation of new ideas, a space where practitioners from different artforms can converse, and an environment conducive to collaborative enterprise and improvisation.

Phonica: Three
8pm, Wednesday 15 June 2016
Jack Nealons, 165 Capel Street, Dublin 1
Admission Free

Michelle Hall is a visual artist who works with a variety of materials and processes and her work often takes the form of video with scripted voiceover. Throughout her practice she uses objects, images, details and textures as catalysts for narratives that fall somewhere between fact, fiction and myth. She recently graduated from the MA Art in the Contemporary World programme at NCAD with a first class honours and received the Artist’s Support Scheme Bursary from Fingal Arts Office in 2014 and 2015. She also collaborates with other practitioners and has shown collaborative projects at IMMA, Triskel and Pallas Projects. She has exhibited work in group shows at Block T, MART, Draíocht, The LAB and Catalyst Arts as well as other venues across Ireland, France and the UK. She presented her first solo exhibition ‘The Lament of the Jade Phoenix’ at Steambox Gallery in January of this year.

Keith Lindsay is a Dublin based sound artist who works with a wide range of media including music, sound, projection, film, sculpture, and electronics. His recent projects include a solo exhibition "Soundscapes" at the Pallas Project Studios and a new sound works for the Nag Gallery Dublin. He is a member of the experimental arts collective 'The Water Project' which he has performed with in Paris, London, Kiev, Cork & Dublin. His work as a sound designer has been featured in TV documentaries, feature films, short films and interactive media.

Aodán McCardle is a painter, a poet, gardener, tattooist, designer, maker, father, he has delivered babies warm in the dark and wrapped the dead in white hospital cotton. He is a co-editor at Veer Books. His PhD is on Action as Articulation of the Contemporary Poem though physicality and doubt are the site of meaning and the stance respectively where the action operates. His way into collaboration was as part of London Under Construction LUC. His current practice is improvised performance/writing/drawing as a finding out. He grew up in the mountains, moved to the city, lives by the sea.

Michael Naghten Shanks lives in Dublin and is editor of The Bohemyth. Recent publications include the special 'Rising Generation' issue of Poetry Ireland Review and The Best New British And Irish Poets 2016 anthology from Eyewear Publishing. In 2015 he was shortlisted for the Melita Hume Poetry Prize and selected for the Poetry Ireland Introductions Series. He has read his work at numerous events, most recently during the International Literature Festival Dublin. Year of the Ingénue (Eyewear Publishing, 2015) is his debut poetry pamphlet. He tweets @MichaelNShanks.

Dylan Tighe is a musician, actor and theatre-maker. His second album Wabi-Sabi Soul - a one-track gapless song-cycle was released in April. It was hailed by The Irish Times as "framing reflective music with remarkable eloquence". His radio drama for RTÉ Record, based around his debut album of the same name, was nominated for the Prix Europa Radio Prize.

Suzanne Walsh is an audio/visual artist and writer from Wexford based currently in Dublin. She uses performative lectures, fiction and voice to explore  various themes, sometimes around the relationships between animal/humans as well as querying the borders of the self. She also collaborates with film-makers, musicians and other artists frequently. She is part of the Hissen sound group performing in IMMA in June, and is taking part in an upcoming show in The Lab Gallery in November called 'A Different Republic'. She is an editor of Critical Bastards magazine and is published recently in gorse journal.

Monday, 23 May 2016

gorse: art in words at ILF Dublin

On Friday 27 May we'll be at a secret location* as part of International Literature Festival Dublin 2016. I was delighted to be asked to programme this event, which I curated around the gorse tagline 'art in words' and which will feature Kimberly Campanello, Maria Fusco, Robert Herbert McClean and Suzanne Walsh.

9pm start, entry €5.00 - Book Here. Full details below:

gorse is “the most vital and outward-looking of Irish literary journals”, featuring long-form narrative essays, original fiction, poetry, interviews and more. An exploration of the potential of literature, gorse is interested in writing where lines between genres blur, and in intersections with other forms of art and culture. For this special event, curated by poetry editor Christodoulos Makris and taking place at a venue to be disclosed to ticket holders on the evening of the performance, gorse presents four writers whose work has appeared in its pages, and with connections to the audio-visual arts.

Kimberly Campanello’s previous poetry publications include her debut collection Consent and the limited edition book Imagines.

Maria Fusco is a Belfast-born writer working across criticism, fiction and theory. Her most recent work, Master Rock, is a repertoire for a mountain, commissioned by Artangel and BBC Radio 4.

Robert Herbert McClean is an experimental writer and audio-visual artist. His debut book Pangs! is available from Test Centre.

Suzanne Walsh is a cross-disciplinary artist whose work often draws on ideas around poetic truth and the human/animal divide.

* to be revealed at time of booking.

Monday, 9 May 2016

European Literature Night 2016 - Edinburgh & London

I look forward to taking part in European Literature Night for the second year running, expanded and rebranded as European Literature Festival, this time representing Ireland at events in Edinburgh and London over 13-14 May 2016.

I'm especially excited to be contributing to these showcases of the diversity of writing and compositional approaches that currently exists in the continent, and to highlight and celebrate the inclusive, cross-border and unhierarchical nature of these events.

My participation is possible thanks to generous funding support from Culture Ireland.

Edinburgh, Friday 13 May
The Edinburgh edition, curated by Colin Herd, Theodora Danek and SJ Fowler, and presented by The Enemies Project on behalf of UNESCO Edinburgh City of Literature, will comprise two events:

Part 1: 5pm – 6.30pm at North Edinburgh Arts Centre, 15a Pennywell Road, Edinburgh, EH4 4TZ: Performances from selected poets involved in European Literature Night.

Part 2: 8pm - 10.30pm at Summerhall, Summerhall Place, Edinburgh, EH9 1PL – Red Lecture Theatre: Performances from European and local to Edinburgh poets followed by a specially commissioned collective performance.

Both events are free, but booking (through the links above) is recommended.

Ásta Fanney Sigurðardóttir, Nurduran Duman, Billy Ramsell, Alessandro Burbank, Alexander Filyuta, Christodoulos Makris, Efe Duyan, Martin Bakero & Tomica Bajsic. With supporting readings by Edinburgh-based poets Heather O’Donnell, Dominic Hale, Colin Herd and Graeme Smith.

Be a part of #EuroPoem: #EuroPoem is a collaborative international poetry initiative which responds to a need to explore what Europe is, means, and can be ahead of the UK’s referendum on EU membership. European writers are invited to submit two lines of poetry to the collective poem; contributions are of equal value, with no one poet setting the agenda of the poem. Curated by Colin Herd and Theodora Danek, #EuroPoem is an exciting cross-European poetry event. Following its launch in Edinburgh at Summerhall, the poem will continue to emerge and evolve online through the Twitter hashtag #EuroPoem. No two versions of the poem need be the same, as it will constantly re-emerge as poets from across Europe continue to add to this collaborative work. We would like you to be part of this first iteration of #EuroPoem and become part of European Literature Festival. Please tweet your two lines of poetry to @edincityoflit using the hashtag #EuroPoem as part of European Literature Festival on 13th May, or email Colin Herd on with your contribution.

London, Saturday 14 May
With my fellow participants in Edinburgh I will then travel to London for the following evening's first ever European Poetry Night. Curated by SJ Fowler, it will feature brand new collaborations across languages, styles and nations written specifically for the occasion - including my collaboration with France-based poet, musician and psychotherapist Martín Bakero.

Rich Mix Arts Centre, 35-47 Bethnal Green Road, London E1 6LA
7.00pm, Free Entry

Vanni Bianconi (Switzerland) & Billy Ramsell (Ireland)
Alessandro Burbank (Italy) & Alexander Filyuta (Russia / Germany)
Ásta Fanney Sigurðardóttir (Iceland) & SJ Fowler (UK)
Ulrike Ulrich (Switzerland) & Jen Calleja (UK / Malta)
Nurduran Duman (Turkey) & Jonathan Morley (UK)
Christodoulos Makris (Ireland / Cyprus) & Martin Bakero (France)
Tomica Bajsic (Croatia) & Colin Herd (Scotland)
Ghareeb Iskander (UK) & Ahsan Akbar (UK)
Ariadne Radi Cor (Italy) & Iris Colomb (France)
Ana Seferovic (Serbia) & Agnieszka Studzinka (Poland)
Rufo Quintavalle (UK / France) & Ian Monk (UK / France)
Niillas Holmberg (Sami) & Peter Sulej (Slovakia)
Efe Duyan (Turkey) & Livia Franchini (Italy)

Tuesday, 3 May 2016

Compass Lines #2

We're in Belfast for Compass Lines #2, where I'll be in conversation with Miriam Gamble and Nerys Williams, and where the poets will present their collaboration City of Two Suns, specially commissioned for the event and published that day by the Irish Writers Centre. In addition, earlier in the day they will deliver a joint writing workshop in the Ulster Museum to a group composed of participants in various existing writing classes in Belfast.

Compass Lines is a writers’ exchange project aiming to establish links between writers and communities in the North and South of Ireland, while additionally examining relationships between the East and West of these islands, through workshops, public discussions, and the commissioning of new collaborative writing.

Developed by poet, editor and curator Christodoulos Makris in collaboration with the Irish Writers Centre as producing organisation, and with the participation of the Crescent Arts Centre as partner venue.

Compass Lines #2
Miriam Gamble & Nerys Williams
Wednesday 11 May 2016, Crescent Arts Centre, Belfast
7.30pm, entry via Eventbrite €8/€6 or on the door €10/€8

Compass Lines Irish Writers Centre

Miriam Gamble is from Belfast, but now lives in Edinburgh. She is a graduate of both Oxford and Queens University Belfast and in 2007 she won an Eric Gregory Award for her pamphlet with Tall-lighthouse entitled This Man’s Town. Her first full-length collection, The Squirrels are Dead (2010) won a Somerset Maugham Award in 2011, and Pirate Music followed in 2014, both of which are published by Bloodaxe.

Originally from West Wales, Nerys Williams lectures in American Literature at University College, Dublin and is a Fulbright Alumnus of UC Berkeley. She has published poems and essays widely and is the author of A Guide to Contemporary Poetry (Edinburgh UP, 2011) and a study of contemporary American poetics, Reading Error (Peter Lang, 2007). Nerys’s first volume, Sound Archive (Seren, 2011), was shortlisted for the Felix Denis (Forward) prize and won the Rupert and Eithne Strong first volume prize in 2012. She is the current holder of the Poetry Ireland Ted McNulty Poetry Prize.

Friday, 22 April 2016

Review of The Architecture of Chance in Trumpet

Issue 5 of Poetry Ireland's literary pamphlet Trumpet (Spring 2016) carries Michael S. Begnal's review of The Architecture of Chance - in a piece also discussing Trevor Joyce's Rome's Wreck and Peter O'Neill's The Dark Pool.

Begnal describes the book's devices as "similar perhaps to Dada, Oulipo or the more recent Flarf poets" and remarks that despite such practices often being looked upon as "rarefied or merely academic exercises" the work is in fact "deeply engaged with the world, at times outright political". He uses examples as varied in approach as 'XXXXX', 'From Something to Nothing', 'Prime Time' and 'Two Nudes' to discuss the book's concerns (its "wry socioeconomic critique" among others) and concludes with the view that The Architecture of Chance "manages to be continually engaging, often surprising, and frequently funny".

My thanks to Michael Begnal for his perceptive and generous reading of the book, and to Poetry Ireland's Paul Lenehan for commissioning it for Trumpet.

The issue also features an essay by Enda Coyle-Greene - arising out of last year's cross-stream: ways of writing project - in which she writes about the composition of her poem 'Metathesis'.

Other articles in Trumpet 5 include reviews of books by Breda Wall Ryan and Connie Roberts, an appreciation of C. K. Williams by Michael O'Loughlin, a piece on poetry in Belfast by Stephen Connolly, and poems by Blake Morrison, Doireann Ní Ghríofa and Gabriel Rosenstock.